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'Crusty' cooked food may not be good for you

A University of Illinois study suggests avoiding cooking methods that produce the kind of crusty bits you would find on a grilled hamburger, especially if you have diabetes and know you are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

“We see evidence that cooking methods that create a crust – think the edge of a brownie or the crispy borders of meats prepared at very high temperatures – produce advanced glycation end products (AGEs), says nutrition professor Karen Chapman-Novakofski.  

"And AGEs are associated with plaque formation, the kind we see in cardiovascular disease.” 

In the study, the scientists compared the 10-day food intake of 65 study participants in two ethnic groups: Mexicans, who have higher rates of diabetes and a greater risk of complications from the disease, and non-Hispanic whites.

“We found that people with higher rates of cardiovascular complications ate more of these glycated products. For each unit increase in AGEs intake, a study participant was 3.7 times more likely to have moderate to high risk for cardiovascular disease,” says Claudia Luevano-Contreras, first author of the study.

The study showed that non-Hispanic whites had a higher intake of AGEs and they consumed more saturated fats.

However, the association between AGEs and cardiovascular disease was stronger than for saturated fats and heart disease, she says.

Comments and questions
4

Also affects those with a propensity to gout.

BCBs [ black crunchy bits ]

mmm, mmm, mmm.

Do you think?

Need to work it off if you eat hard ... eat hard, work hard, play hard.

The burnt bits on the meat you BBQ is especially carciogenic. You shouldn't eat those. Very bad, cancer-causing charred meat from the BBQ.