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GLOBAL TECH WRAP: NSA exploited heartbleed bug for years - report

The US National Security Agency knew for at least two years about a flaw in the way that many websites send sensitive information, now dubbed the Heartbleed bug, and regularly used it to gather critical intelligence, two people familiar with the matter have told Bloomberg. The NSA denies the claim.

Turkey's Prime Minister is threatening to 'go after' Twitter for tax evasion, reports AFP. Recep Tayyip Erdogan earlier tried to ban Twitter, put was foiled by citizens using workarounds, and Turkey's High Court, which ruled against the ban.

Amazon is planning its own smartphone, says the Wall Street Journal. The e-retailer has broad hardware ambitions that may soon yield a smartphone, with a 3D-like screen and multiple sensors for tracking eye movement. The device is coming soon, people who have been briefed on the company’s plans said. Amazon already has its "Kindle" and Android-based "Kindle Fire" series of tablets, which are sold at low cost as a way to hook people into content sold via Amazon. It has also recently lauched Fire TV, an Apple TV-style device for streaming broadband content to a regular television.

A new infographic guide is out to the sites affected by Heartbleed (click to zoom):

 

Comments and questions
2

So the NSA have been hacking corporate websites throughout the world using this security bug used all over the internet.

The GCSB is tasked with protecting NZ digital security as well as being a spy partner with the NSA.

Did the GCSB also know about heartbleed through its NSA connection?

IF GCSB knew did at help all the kiwi institutions the GCSB now compulsorily consults with on digital security matters through the new TICS legislation?

When you join the spy side and the security of national interest and infrastructure side of GCSB in the same organisation (because JK said it was economically efficient to do so) which side takes priority?

Will known security holes be left in our electricity, banking and telecommunications that could/should be patched because it makes an easy attack vector for NZ and US spies?

Have all the security plans that NZ companies now must give the GCSB been given to the NSA so they can more easily hack into NZ computing systems? In fact did the NSA have a hand in writing the legislation in the TICS act to make their job of hacking kiwi institutions easier? Given they are hacking everybody ease in the world we would be foolish to think they are not hacking us too.

We are indeed that foolish. International espionage has no borders and no friends. To think otherwise is indeed foolish.
Transparency breeds accountability.