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UPDATED: Landcorp, keen recipient of Fonterra's guaranteed milk price, looks to reduce dairy exposure

UPDATED: Landcorp, New Zealand's biggest corporate farmer, has been an enthusiastic participant in Fonterra Co-operative Group's [NZX: FCG] guaranteed milk price scheme as it reduces exposure to volatile dairy prices, while looking at ways to reduce the dominance of dairy in its portfolio.

The state-owned farmer's milk revenue soared 70 percent to $129 million in the year ended June 30, contributing to a more-than doubling of operating profit to $30 million. It won't see a similar benefit from dairy prices in the current year, given dairy prices have tumbled this year from their highs in February.

"We're making sure we don't get too reliant on dairy income so the more volatile dairy sector doesn't become too dominant in the portfolio," chief executive Steven Carden told BusinessDesk. Landcorp's strategy includes exploring fixed-price contracts, hedging and greater cooperation with customers across both dairy and meat, he said.

Fonterra trialed a pilot guaranteed milk price in the 2014 season, offering to sell 15 million kilograms of milk solids at $7 kg/MS. The trial was more than twice over-subscribed, meaning participants were scaled back to just 40 percent of what they sought. Demand isn't quite as red hot in the current season. Up to 40 million kg/MS was offered at $7 kg/MS in June, attracting applications for 26 million kg/MS. A further 20 million kg/MS will be offered in December.

"We've pretty aggressively pursued the guaranteed milk price," Carden said. "I'm surprised more in the industry don't take it up." 

Last week, Landcorp said operating profit would fall to a range of between $8 million to $12 million in 2015, missing the $20.5 million forecast in its statement of corporate intent and reflecting the slide in global dairy prices this year from their February peak. That slide prompted Fonterra Co-operative Group to slash its forecast farmgate milk price to $6 per kilogram of milk solids from $7 kg/MS.

Over the medium to long term, the company will take steps to reduce exposure to commodity price cycles, including widening the range of livestock farmed and increasing its focus on red meat production of lamb, beef and venison, which have less volatile prices. The company is also looking at niche markets for products where it can have a direct relationship with customers.

One example is supplying livestock to Silver Fern Farms for sales under the house brand of UK supermarket chain Tescos, which includes "selling the Landcorp story," Carden said. The company is also targeting the high-end of the North American beef market, where there is demand for grass-fed, antibiotic-free meat for the table, competing against marbled, feedlot-produced meat.

Much of New Zealand's beef export trade to North America is for the ground meat, or hamburger market, but Carden said American consumers aren't wedded to the taste of marbled beef the way some Asian consumers are.

Costs rose 15 percent to $207 million in the latest year, reflecting the start of Landcorp's share-milking agreement with Shanghai Pengxin Group, which acquired the Crafar farms, and the expansion of its dairy conversion programme in the Waikato.

Carden said the partnership with Pengxin "has been a very positive one" and he would be keen to discuss a management role for the Lochinver Station in the central North Island, if the Chinese company can navigate a pre-election political backlash and gain Overseas Investment Office approval to buy the 13,800 hectare property.

Such a deal isn't certain as existing management are currently operating the farm. In Pengxin's acquisition of Synlait Farms in the South Island it left existing managers in place, Carden said.

The 2014 year had generated exceptional returns but Carden said  farming is still "clearly on an upward trend."

"Despite the bottom-line impact of the projected fall in milk prices for 2014/15, Landcorp was well placed to continue to record sustainable profit growth over the medium term," he said. "We're very focused on initiatives to raise productivity and efficiency across our operations."

(BusinessDesk)


EARLIER: Landcorp posts 133% gain in full-year operating profit as dairy sales surge

Landcorp posted a 133 percent increase in full-year operating profit as New Zealand's biggest corporate farmer benefited from a surge in dairy prices that won't be sustained in the current year, allowing it to lift its dividend payment by 40 percent.

Operating profit was $30 million in the 12 months ended June 30, from $13 million a year earlier, the Auckland-based company said in a statement. Sales climbed 37 percent to $241.7 million, including a 70 percent gain in milk revenue to $129 million. Net profit soared 402 percent to $54.7 million, reflecting changes in the value of financial instruments and livestock.

Last week, state-owned Landcorp said operating profit would fall to a range of $8 million to $12 million in 2015, missing the $20.5 million forecast in its statement of corporate intent, reflecting the slide in global dairy prices this year from their February peak, which prompted Fonterra Cooperative Group to slash its forecast farmgate milk price to $6 per kilogram of milk solids from $7/kgMS.

"Despite the bottom-line impact of the projected fall in milk prices for 2014/15, Landcorp was well placed to continue to record sustainable profit growth over the medium term," chief executive Steven Carden said in a statement. "We're very focused on initiatives to raise productivity and efficiency across our operations."

Costs rose 15 percent to $207 million in the year, reflecting the start of its share-milking agreement with Shanghai Pengxin Group, which acquired the Crafar farm, and the expansion of its dairy conversion programme in the Waikato.

Landcorp will pay the government a $7 million dividend, up from $5 million a year earlier. Its total shareholder return was $115.9 million in the latest year, from a loss on that basis of $1.5 million in the previous year. The turnaround mainly reflected a $36.7 million gain on the value of livestock and a $67.6 million revaluation gain on land and improvements, it said.

Carden said that in the medium and long term, Landcorp "will be taking significant steps to reduce our exposure to commodity price cycles." It aims to do that by widening the range of livestock farmed and increasing its focus on red meat production of lamb, beef and venison.

"We also plan to ensure our products are targeted at niche markets where we can have a direct relationship with the customer," he said.

(BusinessDesk)

Comments and questions
9

$7Mil Dividend! Could you Mr Underhill, by any chance give us the return on the taxpayers capital this "$7mil dividend" represents?
Ta in anticipation.

I'll take a guess and suggest 1%.

For the National Party that stands for free enterprise the fact that the Government owns 137 farms via Landcorp is a disgrace. There could and should be 4-500 individual farming families operating this land.

Perhaps there will be, once we adopt Chinese cold-climate farming techniques at places like Lochinver.

The learning isn't all one-way. "When we came here, our Chinese growers were surprised and amused when we had top of the line arbors shipped over here for trellising the grapes," said Luis Schmidt Montes, Chile's ambassador to China. "They asked us what we were going to do with those, and when we explained, they all said ��Bu hao!' (No good!) very loudly." The site isn't too far from Shandong province, China's coastal agricultural zone that is temperate enough to expose grape vines to winter weather. But the northern part of Tianjin gets kissed with -20 C and chilly winds. Here, the vines must be planted at an angle so they can be covered with soil during the coldest months, the way they protect vines in the blustery climates of Gansu and Xinjiang. "We still have those arbors," Schmidt said with a chuckle, "as a monument to our foolishness." That miscalculation aside, the Chileans offer a lot of expertise. "Table grapes represent 42 percent of our agricultural exports," Schmidt said. http://en.ce.cn/Business/Macro-economic/201206/27/t20120627_23439580_1.shtml

There is far more logic in selling Landcorp than there ever was selling the power companies.

Just imagine the economic performance under the guidance of many individual families pursueing their own interest with personal responsibility for their decisions.

Landcorp is the way Russia used to be like.

Next thing, a NZ-Mongolia demonstration farm?

Ecological migration: forced relocation of Mongol herdsmen http://iso.hrichina.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/CRF.4.2006/CRF-2006-4_Ecological.pdf

Lincoln just launched another farming partnership in the lower North Island for vocational training and demonstration in lamb and beef finishing systems. See http://www.lincoln.ac.nz/News--Events/News/Current/New-partnership-a-boost-for-sheep-and-beef-farming/

No individual farmer could survive with Landgrabs return on investment. Watch this space, Finlayson will grab farms for settlements when he see,s fit, after all landcorp is a land bank for getting around no private land will be used in settlements.

So New Zealand's version of the Soviet Style Peoples Farm, Landcorp is to wind back it's dairy investments on the basis of a one year experience. Their philosophy obviously is one of buy when the price is high and sell when it's in decline It is only because of the support of the long suffering taxpayer that this is possible. No individual farmer could survive under this management plan.
Landcorp should be sold over the next few years to New Zealand farming families. We should not continue headlong into a Socialist situation where the owners of New Zealand farmland will be reserved for large scale corporate interests, Iwi and Soviet style Socialist interests

In the countries of Central and Eastern Europe—Czechoslovakia, Rumania, Poland, Bulgaria, et cetera—agrarian laws have been passed limiting land ownership, in principle, to a maximum of five hundred hectares. ... If those who hold a democratic-liberal doctrine are truly seeking a solution to the problem of the Indian that, above all, will free him from servitude, they can turn to the Czechoslovakian or Rumanian experience ... For them it is still time to advocate a liberal formula. They would at least ensure that discussion of the agrarian problem by the new generation would not altogether lack the liberal philosophy that, according to written history, has governed the life of Peru since the foundation of the republic. (Mariategui 1928)

gamonalismo, a term meaning “bossism,” used in Peru, Ecuador, and Bolivia. It is derived from gamonal, a word meaning a “large landowner,” and it refers to the exploitation of the Indian population, mainly by landowners of European descent. In the 1920s the Peruvian Marxist writer José Carlos Mariateguí attacked gamonalismo as the worst abuse in the Peruvian political system; in so doing he influenced many of his contemporaries to espouse Socialism. (encyclopedia britannica)