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Arrivals climb as Chinese celebrate Year of the Snake

New Zealand visitor arrivals climbed 9 percent last month as Chinese visitors more than doubled from a year ago amid celebrations of the Lunar New Year.

Short-term visitor arrivals rose to a seasonally adjusted 223,410 in February from 204,950 a year earlier, according to Statistics New Zealand.

The number of Chinese visitors rose 106 percent to 31,536 and arrivals from Hong Kong jumped 144 percent to 3760. US visitors rose 8.9 percent to 26,896, carrying on the trend last month as more Americans visited New Zealand on cruise ships.

"This largely reflects the timing of the Chinese New Year, which fell in February this year compared to January last year (and wouldn't be accounted for in the seasonally adjusted numbers)," Westpac Banking economist Felix Delbruk says in a note.

"Looking through the volatility, visitor arrival numbers appear to be improving – they have risen 6.9 percent over the past four months."

Tourists from China have been the saving grace of an industry struggling with a strong exchange rate and high costs of long-haul flights in recent years. Total spend by international arrivals fell six per cent to $5.42 billion in the 2012 calendar year, down from a spike in 2011 from the Rugby World Cup.

Chinese visitor numbers were unseasonally low in January due to the later timing of the Lunar New Year, which ushered in the Year of the Snake.

Today's figures showed a seasonally adjusted net inbound migration of 550 in February, compared to an outflow of 610 in the same month a year earlier. On an annual basis, New Zealand has gained a net 420 new migrants.

The exodus to Australia continued to slow in February, with a seasonally adjusted net loss of 2540, the smallest since January 2011. Some 37,361 more people have moved to Australia in the year ended February 28.

(BusinessDesk)

Comments and questions
3

So we want short-term Chinese visitors with money to spend, but not long-term Chinese investors with money to invest in business and create jobs in the economy. It all makes sense, doesn't it?

Like all countries we welcome tourists. As far as 'investors' goes, Chinese are not necessarily coming here to provide employment for locals. Most Chinese multinationals are a closed shop. Do not be fooled.

It's not Chinese multinationals we are necessarily seeking - though you are correct, Richard, about their being a closed shop.

We desire the Chinese tourists, migrants and business people - more please - they add overall value to NZ.