Sir Paul Holmes’ Waitangi legacy

Family & friends carry Sir Paul's casket at his funeral yesterday (Rod Vaughan)

OPENING SALVO

It’s a year since Sir Paul Holmes penned his infamous Herald column on Waitangi Day.

Sir Paul called for Waitangi Day to be scrapped, saying it was “repugnant,” “ghastly,” “bullshit,” “a day of lies,” “awful and nasty and common,” and a “loony Maori fringe self-denial day.”

The protestors, he wrote, were “hateful, hate-fuelled weirdos who seem to exist in a perfect world of benefit provision,” and “blissfully believe that New Zealand is the centre of the world, no one has to have a job and the treaty is all that matters.”

Sir Paul was immediately and near-universally attacked for being racist.

Always one to back the underdog, I took to the NBR to defend him, saying that while he could have expressed himself more delicately, he had nevertheless made an important point – namely, that those Maori who prefer to focus more on the last 200 years than the next 20, and enjoy protesting more than working, have to accept they will tend to be poorer, sicker and dumber than everyone else.

For my trouble, I too was widely criticised but it turns out Sir Paul and I may not have been in the worst company.

When Sir Paul later apologised to Maori Party co-leader Tariana Turia for the tone of his column, she accepted his apology and replied: “Sometimes things just have to be said.”

Mrs Turia’s dignity and courtesy have always been a million miles from the boorishness and stupidity of the likes of the Harawira clan but is it possible that even the most loutish protestors have also accepted that Sir Paul had a point?

It is as good an explanation as any for why Waitangi Day 2013 turned out to be among the best on record, a genuine celebration of the founding of New Zealand and the success stories of the last 12 months, despite lingering tensions over the water-rights issue.

Was the legacy of Sir Paul’s 2012 Waitangi Day column that he helped cause sufficient reflection to prove himself wrong?

Hand holding
Waitangi week did not begin propitiously.  It appeared the nation would again be divided, this time over the crucial issue of which Ti Tii Marae kuia would hold the prime minister’s hand.  In the end, the hand-holding debacle served only to compromise Titiwhai Harawira’s mana and that of the marae elders.  By refusing to be distracted by such stupidity, the prime minister’s mana was only enhanced.

John Key also cleverly reversed responsibility for the future success of the day.  Rejecting Sir Paul’s advice, and that of the NBR’s Rod Vaughen, he repeated his pledge to attend Waitangi every year for as long as he is prime minister and said it is up to Ngapuhi what use they make of his time.  Should 2014 turn out to be a fiasco – and, being election year, there will be more incentive for one faction or another to disrupt proceedings – it will be Ngapuhi whose mana will be compromised, not his.

Settlements work
The conversation at Waitangi and around the country has also shifted from being primarily about the past to being about the future.

The main reason is treaty settlements, of which there have now been 59, the vast majority happening under the Bolger/Shipley and Key governments.  Upon settlement, the focus immediately goes on the future.  There is not the slightest hint of wallowing in grievance in the South Island and far less than ever before in the North.

In the last year, even Tuhoe, usually seen as perhaps the most angry and radical iwi, has settled with the Crown and begun looking forward.

Unsurprisingly, it is the iwi in the far north, including around Waitangi where Harawira-ism remains strong, who appear most unwilling or unable to make progress on their claims.

Less than $2 billion has been spent on treaty settlements, and that has been over 20 years.  In comparison, the government spends over $20 billion each year on welfare.  At less than $100 million a year, treaty settlements represent far greater value than almost any other government spending.

Maori v Mana
Despite all this, a struggle continues between the forces of progress within Maori society and those who prefer to shout about the past.

The sides of the struggle are represented by the Maori and Mana parties.

The former took an enormous risk in accepting Mr Key’s invitations, in 2008 and 2011, to join his government, even though he did not need them.

In his State of the Maori Nation speech on Wednesday night, Maori Party co-leader Pita Sharples was able to highlight growth in the Maori economy from $16 billion in 2006 to $37 billion in 2011 – at 4.3% growth annually, the Maori economy has outperformed the New Zealand economy as a whole.

He spoke of the growing commercial ties between Maori businesses and China and highlighted the winners of the Maori of the Year Awards, including in business, sport and the arts.

In contrast, Hone Harawira and John Minto’s Mana Party is preoccupied with failure, protest and the past.

The good news is that, despite media perceptions, it is Dr Sharples’ message that is resonating with Maori voters more than Mr Harawira’s.

According to this week’s TVNZ Te Karere DigiPoll, the Maori Party has the support of 28% of Maori votes, and the Mana Party just 6%.

More than ever, it seems that the “hateful, hate-fuelled weirdos” that Sir Paul wrote about are a tiny minority of Maori.  Long may the trend continue.

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75 Comments & Questions

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I saved Paul Holmes piece on Waitangi day in my files. I agree wholeheartedly with everything he said about it. Am sorry he apologized " for the tone." But surprised and encouraged by Turianas honest reply. I'm so tired of Maori who cling to their old culture to milk the whites of their hard earned money, so they can li e like a white while pretending to be " Maori.' If you live like a white you are a hypocrite to say you are living the Maori life. Get a spear and live in the bush and we'll believe you.

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This is an example of the sort of ignorant white trash talk Maori have had to put up with for generations. Cultures evolve. Instead of pretending to be a Pakeha, go back to the slums your forebears undoubtedly came from and fight with the rats for your next meal.

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No Robulla it is a sign that a lot of people have had enough.

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Enough of what? The application of justice and the rule of law for all people in this country regardless of the colour of their skin?

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The land the Maori get back, just rip out all the roads, uproot the power lines, level all the infrastructure etc. Leave no trace of moderncivilisation. The Maori started with a wilderness, so give it back to them in exactly the same state.

Maori give no thanks: that had it not been for European settlement, they would have eaten each other out of existence. Savages-and-cannibals, they were.

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You are exactly the type of Waitangi Bunny Holmes was talking about.
How I wish the family had chosen the 'rush hour' at that benighted place....as the time to have his funeral...giving everyone the excuse they wanted to honour something/one worthwhile.

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"Like a white" = ? , you dont realize your fueling the beast do you. I think Paul Holmes was kinda right as well, but as you have just done, he expressed it with an undertone of a personal 'white vs black' mantra that generalizes Maori and pakeha into the slackers and the Earners. It is this small mindedness that creates an us and them mentality and so we have ongoing hostilities. On a final note I think culture and habitat can be easily separated so could you please enlighten me on your "live in the bush comment".

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Doesn't the small mindedness in fact come from the small group of Maori who are either:
1. Part of the academic/law grievance movement (as I am certain Robulla is given the time they seem to have to troll NBR comments everey time this comes up and call us all racists because we don't agree with their warped reality)
2. The moron brigade like John Hadfield's nephews the Popatas who are uneducated but choose to believe in a particular version of received history not grounded in fairness or fact.

All the Maori people I personally know are middle class, have jobs and are getting on with their lives in a Western democracy. I think their activist fringe should get the same attention that fat pasty git that runs the National Front does.......none. Shame on the media for turning up at Waitangi every year looking for sensationalist violence (or the threat thereof).
NZ Dominion Day can't come soon enough.

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Seems that CD is one of the neo fascists that only wants the rule of law applied to himself and his rich mates. Oh and some of his best friends are Maori.

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Regardless of the worth if your comments, at least get the grammar right: don't you mean "one of the noe-facists who..." (not " neo-fascists that....).
Ignorance in any culture is not helpfiul, nor acceptable

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Paul's comments hit the nail right on the head.

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Thank you for a very thought provoking and positive piece on what has become such an emotive issue. Does the $ 2 B on settlements include the value of assets where ownership is transferred from the Crown to various Maori groups (eg. forests and land), or specifically payments from Treasury?

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Yes. $2 billion is a pittance when considered against the $1.3 billion paid for South Canterbury Finance Investors. Full and final settlement?

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Over and above treaty settlements there is from the taxpayer approximately the equivalent of a South Canterbury Finance every year going to various Maori iniatives that are not available to non-Maori.
What was the figure spent on Maori language programmes over the last 10 years? I am told it was $1 billion, but still the Waitangi Tribunal said that the Government hasn't done enough and therefore "breached the treaty" It has to stop.

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Whatever has been spent on Maori language initiatives, they are available to everyone one of whatever race so aren't in the category of programmes that are available only to Maoris. It is possible there are no such programmes. When Don Brash was asked to come up with examples of race-based programmes, the only one he had was a study group at Auckland University set up by the students themselves. Students doing extra study - race-based or otherwise - is something to be encouraged surely

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What about the recently setup Maori Business unit,, Whanau Ora, Maori health programmes, Maori only scholarships, Maori entry to university with lower entry requirements. There are dozens of different race based programmes, you are in denial. How much demand for Maori language immersion classes do you think exists amongst non Maori?

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You'll find that whanau ora providers have to provide for anyone who wants to be involved, same with Maori health providers that get tax payer funding, Maori scholarships are privately funded. Affirmative action you may have a point about. But if there really are dozens of race based programmes funded by the taxpayer, name a dozen. But specifically: name, place, criteria, source of funds. Brash couldn't even though he more than most had an incentive to name them. It's more urban myth than real.

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I don't have time to "name a dozen" at the moment. But here is an example from the Te Puni Kokiri website just to get started.
Māori Potential Fund
Te Puni Kōkiri's Māori policy framework, the Māori Potential Approach, is about realising Māori Potential or Māori succeeding as Māori. The ultimate aim of the Māori Potential Approach is to better position Māori to build and leverage off their collective resources, knowledge, skills and leadership capability to improve their overall quality of life.

The Māori Potential Fund supports the Māori Potential Approach by enabling outcomes-based investments that help realise Māori potential. This is done by using knowledge obtained through Te Puni Kōkiri's strategic relationships with Māori communities and organisations to make investments in excess of $23 million a year.

It is important to note that while every effort is made to be flexible in considering applications to the Fund to ensure that Māori communities, Iwi and hapū aspirations are met, the Fund does not invest in individuals or commercial activities for individual profit.

The Fund came into effect on 1 July 2006, when funding for seven separate programmes was combined into three new funding streams, whose purpose is outlined below.

Show me where any other than a Maori organisation can apply for this funding.

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"Maori scholaships are privately funded"

Ok How about these ones then? Seems like public money to me!

Nga Rangatahi Toa Scholarship
Of $3000 for a three year tenure.
Contact: Maori Perspective Unit Department of Labour

National Library of New Zealand Scholarships
The National Library of New Zealand Te Puna Matauranga o Aotearoa is offering scholarships to Mäori wishing to study librarianship

e Tari Taake Scholarship
Inland Revenue scholarship available to Maori, Pacific Island and people with disabilities.

Statistics New Zealand is offering a Maori scholarship to assist a person in attending University to study towards a degree or mathematics at an undergraduate level

Ministry of Education Teaching Scholarships
Value: $10,000 each given out in three equal instalments
Categories: Mäori graduates (25 scholarships) -with priority given to those intending to enter secondary training
Mäori non-graduates (10 scholarships)

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And on demand for Maori immersion education by non-Maori, the answer is about the same as for Catholic education by Protestants and atheists. But so what? The fact the state funds something doesn't mean your family has to use it. The important thing is that, subject to rationing, you could use it if you want

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Actually I agree with you the state shouldn't fund religion based initiatives anymore than race based ones. However I think you will find that Catholic schools are pretty much state schools these days in all but name. As I understand it they have to follow the same curriculum as any other state school.

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Don't get off the topic. Look at these so called exclusively for Maori initiatives as restitution. The crown broke the law. Yes? They breached the treaty. Yes? They are criminals then. Yes? Criminals get punished. Yes? The pay restitution to the victims of their crime. Yes? Whats the problem?

Well the problem is that in this example the criminal gets to decide when and how much restitution they are going to pay. Lets apply that as a code of practice for the entire justice system and see what happens shall we? Give it back or pay up!

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Rob ulna - you state a fair if somewhat generalised case. However, one question for you. Have ALL Maori also adhered to the Treaty?

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Wow, you've been fully indoctrinated. You must have a Masters in Victimhood.
YES?

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I have no doubt you apply the same sort of compassion and justice to all other victims of crime in NZ. Yes?

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Compassion for victims of actual crime - yes, but those victims are far cry from the victimhood junkies you're on about, no?

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Read your history.

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I have and I do and that's how I know you're a victim junkie.

I have read both sides of the story which is our true history and not the one-sided, selective, racist version that is being imposed on our young people in schools and Universities. The same version of history that's now used by Maori to steal billions of tax-payers dollars, aided and abetted by the most despicable institution in this country has ever known, the Waitangi Tribunal.

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Yum

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Don Brash must have forgotten about The Waitangi Tribunal - the mother of all race-based programmes.

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Have you run the calculations on the white NZ initiatives that have been run to the detriment of those Maori trying to operate in a white NZ culture? What was the bill for teaching English? If you want to continue this de facto apartheid system that so disadvantages Maori. (And deny the statistics all you want or attribute them to the supposed racial shortcomings of Maori as you do) then at least distribute the nations wealth on a per capita basis or give back what you stole.

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What you need to do Robulla is learn a little bit of true history. Try reading Sir Apirana Ngatas explanation of treaty breaches by Maori as a start.
Your commentary on this forum is no different to the rabel that have historically infected Waitangi day celebrations.
I see no point in continuing this so this will be my last comment.

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Mind shut.

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Now there's the pot calling the kettle black!

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Robulla, what has Sth Canterbury Finance have to do with Treaty settlements? Are you implying that no Maori had any funds in any of the finance companies that were bailed out? In my area a large percentage of Maori get bailed out weekly by Winz.

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Robulla--THAT was not race based.
Don't worry exclusively about your grammar because it will be your internal poison and hatred ( that is readily discernible by us) that will be your downfall.
You have listened to far too much nonsense and too many serious untruths.
Do you want a nation or a battle zone ??

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A nation. That is what the Treaty promised. And the settler government broke it. The Treaty is the basis for nationhood. Do you want a nation? Then honour the Treaty. In case you haven't noticed we are in a battle zone and have been for 160 years. The only thing that has changed are the weapons. For Maori, they now are the very laws that Pakeha used to attempt to overthrow everything Maori. And Justice.

'It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.'

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New Zealanders, with their sense of fair play, did not initially mind seeking genuine grievances. What you have overlooked, Matthew, is some of these claims have passed the scrutiny of a genuine court of law, it would have been thrown out. This is a very Pollyanna-ish column yu have written.

What has actually happened is that claims that have been quite simply spurious, with the hard evidence against them, have been endorsed by recent National governments in particular, in order to woo "the Maori vote" away from Labour.

The endorsement of the NgaiTahu claim was described at the time as a swindle - and there is very good evidence indeed that this claim should never have been ratified. Ngai Tahu have since continued to greedily raid tax payers' pockets, with the connivance of this present government and the Minister of Treaty Negotiations whom they initially hired at the time, and who has been viewed as less than objective in his portfolio since..

This generation of New Zealanders is being impoverished by the hundreds of millions of dollars that continue to be thrown at iwi claims - Key trumpeted that $200 million alone will shortly be going to one Northern iwi.

Yet this generation of New Zealanders was not responsible for any of these so-called wrongs - some genuine - some certainly not (even Justice Ed Drurie and Dr John Robinson have highlighted this fact) so more wrongs are now being committed against New Zealanders as a whole. Essentially, we are being robbed.

Meanwhile , we can't even keep young New Zealanders in this country; family folk are having to uproot and flee overseas; and the amount directed towards science and innovation is risibly inadequate, compared to what keeps being showered on activist iwi.

Incidentally, the supremely manipulative and soft-voiced voice.Tariana Turia has been one of the most activist and bigoted of all, continually throwing accusations of "racist" at concerned New Zealanders questioning the growing emphasis towards apartheid in this country.

If some radicalised Maori are now soft-pedalling on their stroppy former stance, it is because they sense the mood of the country has well and truly changed, and that New Zealanders are simply fed up.

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This is another ignorant, inaccurate fact-empty rant. Keep talking please. Its stuff like this that firms the resolve of law abiding, fair-minded people seeking justice and the application of the rule of law for all people in an NZ society that has been too close to apartheid for generations. Amandla.

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Sorry I don't get your point are you saying that currently laws and privileges that favour Maori are close to Apartheid?

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No Graeme. What I am saying is that the current laws and privileges that favor Pakeha, to the exclusion of or detriment to Maori, are close to apartheid.

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What laws are you referring to. Please name the laws that favour Pakeha.

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All of them. Maori survived in this country for 1000 years before the coloniser arrived. They had their own justice systems, education systems, health systems sprituality, art forms, written language, the works. Whose laws govern those activities now? Not Maori ones.

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Didn't think you'd be able to name any. Good effort, try harder next time.

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This is just too hilarious for words. Robulla must be a lecturer in Maori studies somewhere.

Justice sysems = constant state of war, brutality and cannibalism. Winners didn't write history (they couldn't - see below), they ate the losers.

Education system = no written language (I think the only people in the world not to have mastered this basic feature of civilization).

Art forms = primitive carvings, admittedly some are striking (not just the weapons ...)

Health systems = evidence?

Spirituality = stone age superstitions and myths.

Written langauge - evidence? Let's see some 18th century Maori literature.

"The works" - failed to invent the wheel, no working with metal, no reading or writing. I believe all of these "works" are unique to Maori.

I suppose they did "survive" - unlike the Moriori - but when "the coloniser" arrived he found a civilisation whose achievements were somewhat limited.

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You reveal your ignorance and racism in all its putridity.

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No - just citing a few inconvenient truths and still eagerly awaiting some evidence of Maori cultural achievements.

Another candidate for "World's Shortest Book"?

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@Robulla you have no idea idea what you are talking about I lived in apartheid South Africa and it is nothing even remotely close to apartheid. There are no restrictions holding Maori back just their poor me everybody owes me victim mentality. If you continue to think this way you will stay in the past and will not succeed. The only thing holding Maori back are Maori themselves and their greedy handout iwi leaders.

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How about poverty? What was that caused by? Land theft. Give it back or pay up.

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Really?? so that you can grow more gorse???
Use what you are currently wasting and covering with rubbish and I would then support returning land.
When is enough just that ???? ENOUGH

And please tell us who employs you. Thanks

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Robulla is obvioisly a white person trolling.
Otherwise the ignorance is impossible

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Sir Paul's column was right on target.
It is up to Maori leaders to guide the remaining rabble/protesters into the modern day.
Sharples has done an outstanding job for Maori as evidenced by the stellar growth in Maori wealth; grounds for complaint no longer exist. liberte

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Personally I am not convinced that these full and final settlements will be the end of it. Having recently taken more interest in what has been going on I am very concerned by the lack of objectivity that is displayed by the Waitangi tribunal and the constant re-writing of our history. A classic example is the WT recommendation that the Government should compensate Moriori because they failed to react quickly enough to a request for help in 1862. This is after the Moriori had been systematically destroyed (I won't go into the graphic detail) by Taranaki Maori starting in 1835 before there even was a Colonial government. What did Taranaki Maori have to say? It was the custom of the time. This country is never going to progress until we have a society where we are all equal under the law and our taxes are spent according to need not race. I urge everyone who hasn't to sign the "declaration of equality" at http://www.nzcpr.com/petition_EqualRights.php

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Mr Hooton. Once again a piece worthy of framing.
I am though less charitable. Waitangi means nothing to me and never will.
Maoridom, its radicals, cloying politicians and fellow travellers have for too long created a septic Isle that continues to blight the country.
I fear that the secret back room constitution discussions the evil hypocrites are currently plotting will prove, despite denials, that we are closer to apartheid than democracy.
I no longer trust and therein says it all.

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If the Constitutional Review is to have any value it has to be taken to the people for submissions and then put to a binding referendum of all voters. If 60% of the population vote positively for the suggested Constitution then it should be enacted with a guaranteed review after 10 years. If the National Party attempts to create a Constitution for NZ without a referendum then the government will lose its legitimacy for most NZers.

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The word not was omitted in my previous comment. What it should have said is that some of these claims would certainly NOT have passed the scrutiny o fa court of law.

The Maori economy is now estimated at being worth $37 billion- yes - billion, enough to more than ensure that any one, apparently disadvantaged (a racist claim in itself) by having a percentage of Maori genetic inheritance, should now be wealthy.

However, the powerful and self-serving iwi made sure that the settlement benefits did NOT get passed down to the poor and disadvantaged of their tribes. instead, their executives and family hangers-on have done very well for themselves.

In the end, the facts trump emotional claptrap. The country continues to be impoverished by funding on the basis of race, and by insufficient examination of what are now provably spurious, or at the very least highly doubtful claims - as with the Tuhoe one.

Tribes in fact have lied, and suppressed evidence against their case, to get government funding. and the government has endorsed the latter, quite, culpably,either without sufficient scrutiny or becaus eit simply hasn't cared to act in conscience - in order to get these votes.

And spite of the nonsense emoted by STeve B, his ignorance in fact, is quite striking.

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There are more votes in attacking Maoris than giving them money so it's not for the votes that politicians do the settlements. And the $37 billion figure is suspect. It includes all private wealth of Maoris including Rob McLeod and Ralph Norris. $37 billion wouldn't be too much more than the value of housing stock in Grey Lynn and St Mary's Bay these days so doesn't mean much.

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If only there were more free thinkers. People that sought out then considered the facts and allowed themselves to challenge their prejudices. Fat chance of that happening with this contributor.

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Just remember to keep things in perspective - despite all the media coverage etc, we are only talking about a small minority of Maori that cause all the problems.

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Exactly. I look across the water at Waitangi with no desire to go there. Our community has a real partnership between all races and cultures. We have neither need nor time for the posturing pretences of the "Treaty partnership" with their power-hungry embittered greed covered with platitudes. Those who have poisoned the waters of Waitangi can drink it by themselves.

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Alan of course you don't want to go over there. What you will see would challenge your bigotry to the bone. I challenge you to. The only people poisoning the waters at Waitangi are the dairy farmers.

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B.s. Robulla. I have Maori neighbors on 3 sides, was working with another Maori friend this morning, my grandson is part Maori and I have sponsored Books in Homes at a local total immersion Maori school for the past 15 years.

I suspect one of us is bigoted and possibly stupid with it, but it isn't me.

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The opening lines of this story are they greatest way of summing up Waitangi day we need more people like Sir Paul to speak there minds

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Oh for heavens sake Robulla, take a pill or something. Your hatred for anything not maari (meaning some of yourself) is becoming so oooo boring.

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Then don't read it.

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Robulla, stop being such a loser. You have no mana with your superficial and pathetic arguments. You are embarrassing the rest of us Maori.

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I see Steve B doesn't like facts."Free thinking' may well suit those who don't want to take them on board.

But facts trump self-serving thinking. And the facts are indisputable, no matter how much one can try free-thinking one's way to avoid them.

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Cassandra, you haven't presented any facts. Just a series of assertions and that you don't like Chris Finlayson. You remind me of Amy Brooke who used to write in Investigate magazine. She would assert without evidence that students learn less in school than in the past and then attack school principals and other educationalists for making this so.

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Rip the treaty up and burn it. It's just a gravy train for Maori and all the hangers on.

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To Robulla. Your comments are unhelpful. I question what you actually do to work with people of NZ other than Maori. In our tribe we have few left that also do not have a Pakeha ancestory as well, particuarly mokopuna. So we encourage inclusiveness and looking forward otherwise we are disrespecting what makes my mokopuna whole. The alternative is fighting with our own family history that typically includes Pakeha ancestors and Maori. I am getting old (90 years) and I do not even know what truly happened, what my grandfather and great grandfather truly wanted, but I doubt they saw money being made of minerals hundreds of metres deep or kilometres out to sea and wanting money for these. When my time comes I can say I have worked in partnership with Pakeha, and educated youth on Maori culture, protocol, family history, things of more value than money and focusing on nothing but wrongs. They are real and happened, but there are also so many rights I have seen in working positively with Pakeha. Not other people's opinion on what did or did not happen over 150 years ago. Certainly, I do not feel I am owed something out of what I think was the intention of our chiefs signing a piece of paper so many years ago. I say open your eyes and heart to the positive opportunities that exist in working positively. I am older than you and spoke to people who were old enough to speak to those who signed the treaty and they did not have your views. They are wrong and destructive and I hope for you and your whanau you can work through these.

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Very well written, very positive and I thank you.

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Wise and true. A true partnership heals divisions rather than causing them and is inclusive not exclusive. The Treaty industry should be judged against that standard. In my view too much of it fails that test.

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Larrry, you're not producing any facts - just silly assertions. The fact that I have produced in relation to iwi claims, and in relation to Chris Finlayson's actively advancing the cause of Ngai Tahu at the time, whereby they achieved a settlement that had been well and truly rejected in the past for very good reason ... these ARE all facts.

So is the fact that just Justice Ed Drurie admitted that iwi were pressuring their researchers to withhold hard facts - historical evidence - (are you aware of what evidence actual is?) that would prove a claim was wrong. Dr John Robinson admitted in his book that he had done just that. Fact.

The Tuhoe claim which Parliament ratified was riddled with inaccuracies - but the select committee was shocking in its quite evidence bias - as submitters reported in shock at the time. Fact.

Education is another issue entirely, but Amy Brooke's articles (she is a current investigate columnist) are well-written and thorough.

It would be a challenge to find her assert anything without the evidence to back it up.

Yours are the usual typical assertions which dodge both the evidence - and the facts. They certainly don't advance any debate. Why waste of everybody's time?

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Remember Parihaka...

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And remember to get the facts right - not the convenient re-written history

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HKSE 23158.3 23189.6 22832.2 1.25%
NI225 17511.0 17621.4 17210.0 2.39%