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levy

Record result for dairy industry levy vote

John Luxton, DairyNZ chairman

Fruit growers veto levy increase

New Zealand’s commercial fruitgrowers have rejected a plea to increase a levy on produce sold.

Fruit and vegetable grower representative body Horticulture New Zealand (HortNZ) asked growers to approve an increase of about 1c on a $25 carton of apples and less than a cent on a tray of kiwifruit.

The increase would raise the levy from 0.11% to 0.15% of value, or $15 for every $10,000 in sales.

Vegetable growers already pay 0.15%.

Meat & Wool dumps staff, cans projects

Meat & Wool NZ will dump about a third of its head office staff in Wellington following massive budget cuts.

Yesterday the organisation, which has around 30 staff, announced it slashed $6.3 million in its yearr-on-year budget ending a number of projects and minimizing others.

The adjustment was required because of the loss of the wool levy and has been carried out in conjunction with the Meat & Wool New Zealand organisational restructure announced last week.

Meat & Wool chairman Mike Petersen said the dumped projects were funded directly by the wool levy.

Meat & Wool wraps up plans

Existing contracts for wool research and other activities has led to Meat & Wool New Zealand continuing to claim a levy from growers until April 18 next year.

The industry good organisation yesterday notified new levy rates for the next year, effective from October 1.

Woolgrowers will pay 3c/kg of wool until the levy order runs out in April.

Sheepmeat producers will pay 45c a head for the next year and cattle $3.80 a head.

Both the goatmeat and wool levies were lost in Meat & Wool’s recent referendum.

‘Waste minimisation’ presents new cost for businesses

Businesses will have to pay more to dispose of waste after a new levy on landfills came into force today.

The levy, introduced under the Waste Minimisation Act 2008, charges $10 plus GST (effectively $11.25) per tonne of waste disposed at landfills.

While the landfill operators themselves are charged they are expected to fully pass on the cost to businesses and the general public.

The new charge is expected to mean individual households will pay around 20c extra per rubbish bag. On average, this comes to about $10 per household per year.