Dotcom to take extradition case to Supreme Court

Kim Dotcom estimates he has spent $40 million in legal fees on the case.

UPDATE: Kim Dotcom says a Court of Appeal ruling that he is eligible for extradition to the United States is "extremely disappointing" and he will appeal to the Supreme Court.

In a statement today he says he's confident the Supreme Court will hear the appeal because of the significant legal issues at stake. 

"As people will know, I am prepared to fight to get justice, whether it is for me or others.

"Many important cases in New Zealand are not won in the Court of Appeal, or in the Courts below, but are won when they reach the Supreme Court. My case will be one of those."

EARLIER:

Kim Dotcom's US lawyer says he will take the case to the Supreme Court after his client lost their bid to escape extradition to the US. 

The Court of Appeal has ruled Mr Dotcom, plus co-defendants, Mathias Ortmann, Bram van der Kolk and Finn Batato are eligible to be extradited for their participation in alleged criminal copyright infringement, racketeering and money laundering.

The charges relate to the defunct file-sharing website Megaupload.

The final decision as to whether the four men will be extradited will be made by Justice Minister Andrew Little. 

In a tweet, the US lawyer, Ira Rothken, says he's disappointed in the outcome and will "seek review" with the Supreme Court. 

"We are satisfied New Zealand law permits extradition for copyright infringement in the circumstances of this case," said the court's decision, by Justices Kós, French and Miller. 

"The appellants are accused of conduct that, if proved, would establish extradition offences in New Zealand law," it said. 

Mr Dotcom and his Megaupload co-accused lost their extradition case in December 2015 at the North Shore District Court but have since made appeals to the High Court and the Court of Appeal.  

Mr Dotcom estimates he has spent 165 days in court and spent $40 million in legal fees on the case. 

Another legal wrangle
Separately, last Thursday Mr Dotcom posted a win in his suit against the Government Communications Security Bureau for damages relating to the raid on his former Coatesville home the year before.

A Court of Appeal panel decided that Mr Dotcom could argue for further discovery from the government in relation to his case.

Discovery in the case has centred on raw communications of the GCSB regarding Mr Dotcom.


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7 Comments & Questions

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Tall poppy cut down to size had no chance under a Labour Government.

Any success is frowned upon in New Zealand. Take a look at how many IPO's are Not happening on the NZX because Kiwis are too negative and pessimistic on Investing.

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This has nothing to do with ‘Tall Poppy’ it is alleged Dotcom broke US law and they wish to put him on trial for same. Dotcom says he did not but is fighting to keep from being extruded to face these charges. If he is not guilty why not go and face the charges and prove his innocence. He & his supporters say the USA will jail him anyway, RUBBUISH! I for one and tired of my money, tax’s, being used and the courts of NZ being used by this chap to keep him in our country.
The law may allow him all these appeals but this will not be the first or last time someone says; in this instance The Law is an Ass.

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Dotcom claimed the Obama administration was targetting him because the movie and music industries had the president in his pocket.

Now, however, there is a new president in the White House, whom Dotcom openly admires, and -- due to his enthusiastic promotion of various conspiracy theories about the Democratic Party -- Dotcom has become a favourite of Fox News and talk radio star Sean Hannity. And there is new leadership at the FBI and DOJ, installed by Mr Trump. So, yes, you could well say, Why not voluntarily go to the US and fight his case?

 

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Surely he’s a cut down coral gerbera flower and not a tall poppy as per the awesome cover art for his seminal album Good Times.....

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Do some homework and look at all the convictions this guy has wracked up. Would you be defending a white collar crim with the same sort of rapsheet who has fleeced millions from investors over many decades? Me thinks not...

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Can't say I blame him. At his size and weight a prison sentence in the US would end up being a death sentence for the guy.

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I am no fan of Mr Dotcom and this post is not in anyway a form of defence for him. I am deeply concerned with all aspects of this case. From the start a raid using armed policy and helicopters did not follow the standard due process for approval, Hard drives were dispatched to the USA even though this was against the court order are only two examples.

Where is the protection from the law itself when at every turn the government is willing to push the boundaries of the law? The only thing helping Mr Dotcom is his ability to have expensive legal representation. Most of us would have had our fate sealed by now.

I have lost faith in our legal system and politicians as it is obvious they do not have our best interests in hand. They have the interests of those around them. Those with influence. Scary times.

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