CropLogic hires telco exec David de Cuevas as chief operating officer

Managing director Jamie Cairns says the new role is important for its US roll-out.

 CropLogic has hired former telecommunications executive David de Cuevas as chief operating officer, who will lead the ASX-listed Kiwi agritech firm's US expansion.

The Christchurch-based company today announced the appointment effective from Feb. 19, with de Cuevas replacing Matthew Journee who will focus on product development. De Cuevas was most recently at Two Degrees Mobile as general manager of business sales performance and has previously been COO at internet service provider Snap.

"Having such significant experience in the telecommunications industry, particularly in the logistics surrounding the mass-deployment and management of internet-connected devices, means that David will be able to hit the ground running in this role," managing director Jamie Cairns said in a statement. "This is incredibly important in the context of our upcoming rollout into the US market."

The CropLogic system gathers field data, via in-field sensors coupled with satellite communications, to help growers improve the productivity of their crops. Successful trials of the CropLogic system have been completed on potatoes in China, the US, Australia and New Zealand with four of the major multinational potato processors. Further to this, CropLogic is poised to start trials of the CropLogic system in other commodities such as corn, wheat, soybean and cotton.

This month the company said a mobile app under development giving growers immediate access to in-field information will be ready for full release by April and available for the upcoming US growing season.

CropLogic raised A$8 million in an initial public offering on the ASX last year, selling 40 million shares at 20 Australian cents apiece. The shares debuted at 17 cents and have since tumbled to 8.7 cents.

(BusinessDesk)


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Saw this article today - Crop Logic certainly fits into the fertiliser quadrant in my view all Talk and no Walk.

https://www.cbinsights.com/research/startup-founder-criticism/?utm_conte...

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Bets on when they roll out an annoucement that they are going to accept Bitcoin or do something on block chain.......I mean 2017 and they are doing an app? A leading technology company only in their own minds.

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Reckon they'll do well?

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It looks like they’ve acquired a small, unprofitable business and loaded it up with lots of executive salaries and listing costs. This can’t end well.

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My understanding is they have been loaded up with Powerhouse people and resources in addition to the likes of this hire. Will be interetsing to see how the cash burn is going, my guess is they might have money in the bank but the cash burn will mean they don't have a lot of time to be turning things around.

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Another promising career sucked into the black hole vortex of Powerhouse Ventures spin-offs. Good luck and prayers to you Mr Cairns, you'll certainly need both!

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I wonder what it was about the deal that made him do it? Unless he can add something to the technology to make it more marketable it is likely to continue on the same trajectory as the past 10+ years. Be interesting to hear from him.

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Interesting to understand what experience or expertise he has in selling into the agri sector in the US. If the technology works and the roll out of infrastructure should not be hard the thing missing in this company is actual sale of the technology. I would have thought that was the first priority.

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I would have thought the performance of the technology itself (I.e. can it significantly and reliably increase crop yield in a way that makes economic sense) would be the main issue. Difficult to market otherwise. Perhaps that’s the reason they are hiring an experienced salesman, if the technology is inherently flawed there would be no hope except to try spinning it.

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I suspect the technology does not deliver to the degree they promote and therefore is the hard sell. But why hire an ops guy verses sales guys or gals.

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I agree. This company is a disgrace. Over valued ECF, heavily discounted pre ipo con notes, suspended broker, big underwrite fees, underwriter issuing forecasts when the company didn’t, a history of poor to nonexistent sales performance. All culminating in a disgusting share price drop on IPO as insiders dumped on a pumped prospectus. PVL at its finest.
Probably offering the guy a mega salary to compensate.

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This US consultancy now has an operations manager on a rock in the South Pacific that is 4 flights and 40 hours travel time away, and a CFO in Perth where there is no overlap in business hours.
Genius.

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