Government will spend millions on recycling bins for 2011 RWC

In a bid to protect New Zealand's 100% Pure brand the government plans to clean up the country and spend $2 million on extra recycling bins for the 2011 Rugby World Cup. The programme, which will kick off in 2011, will include installing more than 700 "Love NZ" recycling facilities for glass, plastic and cans at stadia, main streets, airports, railway stations and bus terminals in each of the 12 regions hosting Rugby World Cup games.

In a bid to protect New Zealand’s 100% Pure brand the government plans to clean up the country and spend $2 million on extra recycling bins for the 2011 Rugby World Cup.

The programme, which will kick off in 2011, will include installing more than 700 "Love NZ" recycling facilities for glass, plastic and cans at stadia, main streets, airports, railway stations and bus terminals in each of the 12 regions hosting Rugby World Cup games.

Environment Minister Nick Smith said the $2 million, which will be spent on “hundreds” of public recycling bins around New Zealand, is not quite enough.

More than 85,000 rugby fans from around the world and 2500 international media are expected to arrive in New Zealand for the 2011 cup.

“My hope is to attract a further $1 million from councils and industry in the 12 regions hosting the games to enable more recycling facilities to be installed and I will be writing today to mayors to try and secure this additional support.

“These Love NZ recycling facilities and the investment in changing social attitudes to make recycling the norm will be a lasting legacy after the 2011 Rugby World Cup.”

The government’s Waste Minimisation fund is putting $1.6 million towards the programme and the Glass Packaging Forum $440,000.

In a bid to improve the country’s management of waste the New Zealand Waste Strategy was also launched today. With additional waste funding, it aims to reduce the harmful effects of waste and improving the efficiency of resource use.

West Auckland company Tyregone Processors received $300,000 to expand its plant to process more than 2000 tonnes of used tyres a year and the Bay of Plenty Regional Council received $100,000 to expand a vermicomposting trial to deal with organic waste. Vermicomposting uses worms to turn organic waste into high nutrient compost diverting waste from landfill.

1 comment
Login in or Register to view & post comments