NZTA moves to set up electric vehicle charging stations nationwide

The NZTA wants a fleet charging solution.

The NZ Transport Agency is seeking information for a nationwide electric vehicle charging infrastructure as it looks to roll out a further 41 electric vehicles across its fleet.

In a request for information notice, NZTA says it wants to gather market intelligence which it will use to inform its approach when buying charging products and services, but won't use the process to select or shortlist suppliers.

NZTA will replace 139 of its 146 leased vehicles over the next 12 months. It currently has two electric vehicles, one in Wellington and one in Auckland, and expects new EVs will be rolled out across different offices with a range of one to eight vehicles per site, with 15 in Auckland in two different sites, six in Hamilton, one in Tauranga. one in Napier, five in Palmerston North, eight in Wellington, one in Blenheim, two in Christchurch and two in Dunedin.

The initial scope is for 41 EVs to be added in 2018 but it is likely other fleet cars will be replaced with electric vehicles over the next three-to-five years, NZTA said. The request covers information about providing, installing, operating and maintaining the charging stations. It does not include supply of EVs.

NZTA says it is ideally looking for a fleet charging solution that would "enable staff to confidently move to and from NZTA locations in fully electric vehicles". It wants a solution that maximises the utility of the EVs, mitigates any peak demand pricing impacts, complies with safety law and guidelines, conserves vehicle battery healthy, has the potential to integrate with existing software, is scalable and is suitable for varying sites across New Zealand.

In May 2016 the previous government announced an electric vehicles programme aimed at increasing the uptake of electric vehicles in New Zealand to take advantage of renewable energy and reduce emissions. In a November speech, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said the government would require state-owned enterprises and other government organisations to pursue low-carbon options and technologies, including electric vehicles for all government vehicle fleets.

EVs are becoming more popular, with 3,645 light EVs, including plug-in hybrids, registered in 2017, according to Ministry of Transport statistics. The number is up 140 percent on the year.

Responses for the request for information are due on Jan. 29. NZTA then expects to provide an update to participants who submitted a response on the next step in the process on Feb. 2.

(BusinessDesk)


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All we need now are the electric cars to charge on them.

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If the market is there, the products will come.

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Id like to see a community car charger beside every distribution transfomer - and the Lines Compnanies being allowed to store energy on behalf of participating consumers for their discretionary use.

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Why should they do this? They don't subsidise petrol stations. And neither they should.

Have NZTA given any thought to the problems of charging electric cars? I can refill my car at the rate of 400 km/minute. The fastest car charger will do about 300 km/h. For this it needs a power supply of at least 100 kW. So, instead of accommodating eight cars, electric charging stations would need to accommodate something like 50 cars – and that is after allowing for the fact that some people will be able to charge from home. So a power supply of something like 5 MW will be needed which will require a new feeder from the nearest major substation. How much will it cost. Who will pay for it? The owner of the electric car or the general public?

When the model T came on the market it was a revolutionary change from a horse – much more convenient, much cheaper and faster. When the iPhone came on the market it offered things that no one had dreamed of. Both became "must have" items.

An electric car offers fabulous acceleration – and nothing else.

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Well not really. There's a guy at my work that has one, and he loves it. Plus it's not costing him a cent to charge, as he's charging it at work. That is annoying some workmates. I think it's just a jealousy thing. Still, there's nothing stopping them from doing the same.

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Here's how to think about electric car charging....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U_L2LvCvVWE

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Time will tell.

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