The imaginarium and the friendly winery: best Nelson architecture

The New Zealand Architecture Awards for the Nelson Marlborough region last night recognised various buildings including a “friendly” winery, house with a luxurious spa and a maritime themed bridge. C Nott Architects' work on Yealands Winery was awarded in both the commercial architecture and the sustainable architecture categories for its design, which the judges described as confident and straightforward “like its founder” Peter Yealands.

The New Zealand Architecture Awards for the Nelson Marlborough region last night recognised various buildings including a “friendly” winery, house with a luxurious spa and a maritime themed bridge.

C Nott Architects’ work on Yealands Winery was awarded in both the commercial architecture and the sustainable architecture categories for its design, which the judges described as confident and straightforward “like its founder” Peter Yealands.

Three projects by Arthouse Architecture were recognised including the Tasman District Council library complete with an “imaginarium” room for playing music and digital recording.

The library, which judges said was a “lively response to the new script for modern libraries,” won in the public architecture category.

The other Arthouse Architecture projects to be recognised were its Spring Creek House in the residential architecture category and its “vibrant” Greenwood St Pharmacy was recognised in the small project architecture category. In that same category Redbox Architects’ “playful” looking superloo was also recognised.

In the urban design category Irving Smith Jack Architects’ Friendship Boardwalk at Wakefield Quay with a maritime theme was recognised. The boardwalk twas designed to harmonise with nearby apartments.

BSW Architects’ Lee House was recognised in the residential architecture category for its natural materials and spa feel with both Asian and Western influence.

A home by Parsonson Architects known as Apple Bay House was recognised for its two pavilions which had an upper level for living space and lower level for sleeping space.

The awards were judged by Blenheim architect Tim Barton, Marton architect Felicity Wallace and Nelson architect Marc Baron with Wellingtonian Jeremy Jones.

The local winners will be eligible for consideration in the national New Zealand Architecture Awards in early 2011.