Eminem suing National over music in ad – National defends licensing

National is defending its use of music in political advertising as US rap artist Eminem launches a law suit against the party for copyright infringements.

The ad in question was removed from the party’s YouTube channel and TV. It was replaced with a recut version using different music.

The ad allegedly used music from the hit song Lose Youself.

A claim filed in the High Court today alleges the National party used elements of the song.

National has defended its use of the music. In a statement the party says: "The National Party completely rejects the allegation that the library music used in its early campaign advertisements is a copyright infringement of any artist’s work."

The media statement adds that the party bought the music from recognised production music supplier Beatbox, based in Australia and Singapore.

"The music was originally published by Spider Cues Music, a Los Angeles-based provider of music to the film and entertainment industry."

"As with all works licensed by the Beatbox library music service, the National Party was assured the music in question did not infringe any copyright and was an original work."

"Furthermore, the music license and fee were arranged through the Australasian Performing Rights Association and Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society (APRA/AMCOS), who act as agents for Beatbox in Australia and New Zealand. These organisations exist to protect the rights of artists."

Approached by NBR about the subject last week, National party campaign manager Jo de Joux said National was “comfortable there was no issue” with the use of the song.

She said the party “nevertheless ... moved on to the new advertising phase anyway, with a slightly softer music track.”

Joel Martin, speaking on behalf of the music publishers, said: “The claim we have filed alleges copyright infringement. Eminem’s publishers were not approached for permission to use any of Eminem’s songs for this campaign advertisement.

"It is both disappointing and sadly ironic that the political party responsible for championing the rights of music publishers in New Zealand by the introduction of the three strikes copyright reforms should itself have so little regard for copyright.

"We do not hesitate to take immediate action to protect the integrity of Eminem’s works, particularly where a party, as here, has sought to associate itself with Eminem and his work.”

6 comments
Login in or Register to view & post comments