Cadbury losing the comparative advertising war

It’s the war of the chocolate brands and everyone’s invited to sling some mud.
What a shocker of a time to be in advertising/marketing/PR for Cadbury – it’s a real communications nightmare.

I suppose it seemed like a great idea to Cadbury at the time: downsize the chocolate block by 50g, save some money, add in some nasties and take out some goodies, and disguise it all as a better experience for the consumer along with “Great New Packaging”. And hey presto! You’ve fought that evil thing we call “recession” (never mind that chocolate is largely considered recession-proof as it’s a “trivial purchase”).

Cadbury would’ve likely gotten away with it 10 years ago, but things have changed, friends. The consumer isn’t a muppet, for a start – and lack of muppetry is a big stumbling block when a brand is pulling a silly stunt like this. We’re also now in the age of a consumer-enabled technology; the tools are readily available should anyone want to fight back.

And fight they have. It started with a Twitter voice and a website, and then a YouTube “product shrinking” demonstration. Bad! Bad!

It’s culminated in some shocking PR on Campbell Live and an ad by Kiwi chocolate company Whittaker’s, which has proven with an extremely simple presentation that its product is superior. (Worse!)

200g compared to 250g. 21% cocoa compared to 33% cocoa. Added vegetable fat, or pure cocoa butter? Made by dingoes or made by Kiwis? Cadbury, you’re the weakest link. Put out your torch, leave the island, say goodbye to Big Brother and log out of your Facebook.

It's pretty smart for Whittaker’s to jump on the chocolate bandwagon and make hay while the sun shines out of their arse. It's a very simple, clear ad – one that’ll greatly influence consumer perceptions of both brands – and a great way to build on the brand’s campaign line in years gone by of “good honest chocolate”.

Comparative advertising is hardly new, but it’s not often done locally. New Zealand is a nation of people who just don’t want to risk pissing other people off – it’s too small to burn any bridges, so we keep our opinions to ourselves.

Perhaps one of the most famous incidences of comparative advertising was when Burger King took on McDonald’s in the US with this ad featuring a very young Sarah Michelle Gellar, who was then named in a lawsuit from the rather angry Golden Arches.

Locally, the Advertising Standards Authority’s guidelines demand it be factual and informative; should explicitly or by implication make clear what comparison is being made; and should not mislead the consumer about other products or services with which comparisons might be made.

Advertisers shouldn’t “unfairly attack or discredit” other products, advertisers or advertisements either directly or by implication.

Being so simple and clear, the Whittaker’s ad is likely to be home safe.

Cadbury could moan about this – although apparently they have no desire to engage in a tit-for-tat campaign against Whittaker’s – but they prefer to concentrate on the “fun and enjoyment” in chocolate.

Maybe they should concentrate less on fun and enjoyment and more on producing a fair product that lives up to the brand’s heritage.

So where can Cadbury go from here? Papering over the cracks with more Fun-Fun ads involving hairy animals and irritating kids with stupid facial expressions simply isn’t going to cut it. If your product is crap, no amount of Good Ads are going to help. You can throw all the gorillas and eyebrows at it you want, but consumers can see through the thin haze of ad spin and right into the company's evil nasty-pants corporate frozen heart.

Shame on you, Cadbury, for you are evil. (We shoulda known when they killed off the Snifter that things were going downhill.)

So, what say you? Has the chocolate controversy changed your buying habits?

Check out Whittaker’s ads through the years here.

And click here to tell the Whittaker brothers how much you’d love a dark chocolate version of their coconut block. Oooh yeah. You know it.


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68 Comments & Questions

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We are serious chocaholics - about two king size blocks a week. In the past this has been Cadbury but not any longer. Not since they sneakily changed the product on us and substituted it with inferior tasting Australian made chocolate. What ever happened to the glass and a half of full milk? Tastes like a dash of skim milk powder now! I recently read that Cadbury was one of NZ's most trusted brands - not any longer. I say to other chocaholics vote with your stomachs...

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Between this and the United guitar episode - a bad couple weeks for corporate PR teams. And all their 'key messages' won't do a bit of good.

But one question - why has Whittakers waited until this to promote their local angle versus big, corporate, made in Australia? Or did I miss it. I've been here 7 years and don't recall any sort of differentiator campaign like that from Whittakers. Would have gone with the locals all along if I knew that.

I will of course now. It's a no brainer but seems like something they could have promoted more prior to this opportunity being gifted to them from Crapbury.

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W.Wonka, the chocolate made by Cadbury WAS made by kiwis in Dunedin but the new 200 g blocks are now made in dingoland. That and the change in raw materials made it more difficult to compare.
Now I am still at a loss to understand how Cadbury can have fresh Southland and Otago milk still be fresh when it's transported to Australia. That is why their advert defending their practices is such a joke!!!
Whittakers gets my $$ now!

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Their recent ad campaigns have used the line "good honest chocolate" but I also can't recall seeing the NZ angle pushed until now.

Evidently it wasn't until 1992 that the company hit the dingos up.

Perhaps they're too modest for their own good?!

Interestingly, nearly all the Whittaker's dark versions don't contain milk (a happy advantage for the lactose intolerant).

Highly recommend viewing their past ads on the website, very funny.

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Having had to put up with what the Aussies call chocolate while living over there, (much like their "Ice Cream") I can cheerfully inform Cadbury they have lost another customer.
The rot started a while ago when they cut off the Milk producers that used to specificly supply Cadbury in NZ.

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For your information, the Australian and New Zealand Cadbury blocks were made using identical recipes - they were the SAME chocolate. Us Aussies are not happy about the messing with the recipe either and have abandoned Cadbury's in droves.

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My friend made me do a blind taste test on the weekend between the two products. The difference was amazing - Whittakers tasted like proper chocolate and Cadbury's tasted like that horrible imported stuff you get from The Warehouse. I've always been a fan of Cadbury's but the taste has really gone downhill (not to mention the environmental bad karma fom using palm oil), I won't be buying again until they change the recipe.

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In all seriousness, you can not call yourself chocoholic and not eat Whittaker's.
I have been here for 4,5 years and found it is the only real chocolate around.
They do not need to (ab)use the "local"-vs-whatever angle.
To quote another one's slogan:"It's the real thing!".

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Their PR is like their chocloate, weak and not created with any empathy for, or understanding of, the market.
Their PR has for sometime been a perfect case study of how NOT to do anything with media - bad, bad, bad.

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Harry - I agree. The connoisseurs don't need convincing.

But I don't claim to be a 'chocoholic'. More an occasional consumer who doesn't think much beyond a Homer Simpson level of "Mmmm... caramello..." as I wait in the check out.

I don't think I'm unique. I'm willing to bet I'm in a group that is of significant size. So if Whittakers is wanting to get that market to think a bit more about their choice, the local versus Australian angle would be good. Actually, it IS good. The comparison ad out above works now for me - a no brainer. And that's was where my Q came from. They could have been doing this all along.

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Hi my name is Susan and I am a chocoholic - but I have no intention of giving up chocolate all together, just Cadbury Chocolate!

Hazel is dead right, the rot started last year with the Snifters debacle - does it not occur to the PR/Marketing Team that perhaps they should survey consumers before they make these sort of decisions?

The really galling thing about Cadbury is how they make changes - or delete products - without warning. Had they told us in June 08 that they had just produced teh last batch of Snifters then those of us who love them could have had a stock up, but no they wait until Sept 08 and then say - sorry last batch made 3 months ago - stiff bicky to all the Snifter lovers. Same problem this year, suddenly blocks are smaller, softer, and really greasy tasting - oops forgot to let you know that we are making major changes to a NZ icon.
I have always found that buying Cadbury chocolate in Oz has been a major disappointment, so usually stock up on a few blocks before we go on holiday - plus have Kiwi's there who also preferred NZ Cadburys - looks like that is over now, and will be taking stocks of Whittakers instead. No more Cadbury for me, so that's $10-$20 week that will go to Whittakers - and for caramel fans try the Whittakers Dark Caramel, especially good when eaten straight from the freezer!!

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Does anyone know how long they've been using Aussie made choc though? I think most NZers would have assumed it was being made at that delicious smelling Dunedin factory all this time...

While living in Oz about 13 years ago, i had some Cadbury Dairy Milk brought over by a visitor, and did a direct comparison to the Australian version. The NZ stuff was far, far superior in taste and texture.

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I gather there's a taste/texture difference in Cadbury chocolate depending on the country where it is made, due to the need for different melting temperatures (ie Aus would have a higher melting point than the UK). Could be a myth, but I do recall a few Brit friends in Aus bringing back hoards of the UK stuff because it tasted different.

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I can but only add my feelings of betrayal at Cadburys. 200g for the same price as the old 250g size - hmm, interesting price point strategy. Disguise with some cute below line marketing 101 and new packaging to confuse the public. So much for rewarding customer loyalty.

It will be interesting to view the effect on Cadbury sales and market share vs Whittakers from the Nielsen sales scan data.

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Afew weeks ago when news of this started filtering out I started a facebook group "Take Palm Oil out of Cadbury Chocolate" - it has swelled to close to 2000 members, all boycotting cadbury in disgust. I also started a petition which now has close to 1400 signatures. http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/Remove-palm-oil-from-cadbury
Cadbury have screwed up bigtime. Consumers are not stupid sheep. We have voices and vote with our wallets!

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When Cadbury choc bars were made in godzone factory in Dunedin using good Kiwi labour - things were good and I happily scoffed down the locally made product from locally sourced milk.
Now its all shut down and moved to Oz where they have lessened the weight and changed the formula.
So its bugger off time for Cadburys - sorry. Not on my shopping list any more.

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It would seem that attempts to confuse the public with packaging, size, prices is a "legitimate" marketing ploy!
Just look at Beer and the number of different sized packs that can be found on the shelves.
However, marketers do not call it "confusion," they call it "obfuscation" which only further confuses the consumer.
Interestingly, Supermarkets are now pricing goods with a "price per weight" on the price tag.
This is an attempt to clarify the obfuscation. Perhaps they should also have a % of cocoa butter per 100g of chocolate block
If Cadbury was playing baseball, this would seem like "Strike Three" - and there is no confusion there.

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I don't eat all that much chocolate (I get too fat if I do) so I expect the chocolate I do eat to taste like chocolate.

Since I discovered Whittaker's fruit and nut I don't think I've bought another Cadbury product. Whittaker's just tastes better -- and I prefer their packaging to Cadbury's new "let's save a buck while duping the customer" cardboard container too.

Sorry but I used to be a Cadbury fan but not any longer.

Judging by the messages posted here it looks as if Cadbury have really shot themselves in the foot this time. I wonder if they're smart enough to realise that or man-enough to admit the mistake and restore the old chocolate (in the old size) that we used to like?

Nah... with beancounters pulling strings behind the scenes I doubt that will happen.

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At least we have a choice. Personally I prefer, Toblerone, Lindt and Valrhona. I guess if I was going to clog the arteries, might as well be the good stuff.

If Cadbury NZ was smart, they would maintain the old size, at least match the Cocoa content, reduce or remove the vegetable palm oil fat, manufacture and sell locally to compete with Whittakers then also export the chocolate to Australia as a premium environmental(no palm oil) product. This would also then give the dingoes a choice of their locally manufactured product as well as a premium imported product.

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Cadbury's have been losing CDM block share to Whittakers foir years. (Whittakers have often stressed their New Zealand credentials by the way - remember the African bean-growing village where they were all Kiwiphiles?) Cadbury's massive f/u here was quite rightly exploited with a quick, clever and perfectly timed tactical campaign. Comparative ads are under-used.

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Personally, I prefer Toblerone, Lindt or Valrhona. If I was going to clog those arteries, it might as well be the good stuff.

Now that the cat is out of the bag, if Cadbury NZ was smart they would continue to manufacture here and match Whittakers quality contents. They would sell here and also export it to Australia as a premium product. This would give the dingoes a choice of their local product as well as a pricier imported environmental (no palm oil) alternative.

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At the tender age of 50 and having 'grown up' with Cadbury products, I'm off to Whittakers for a try. There is an old and wise saying - 'If its not broken don't try and fix it'. If you are playing around with the recipe, forget it.

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As a chocoholic Cadbury has been converting their blocks over the last 18 months from NZ to Aus. Aus chocolate is definitely different - I suspect has higher melting point as country temperatures are higher i.e. has more 'hardner/ cremelta type ingredient. Caramello is nothing like the old with Aussie chocolate and a different caramel. I sent an e-mail complaining 18 months ago when heard of staff redundancies in Dunedin and didn't even reply. Am now 100% Whittakers fan.

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Just watched the videos. For anyone who didn't watch the Campbell Live one you missed one of the most feeble performances from a corporate salaryman I have ever seen. The Cadburys guy was just hopeless, though I admit he was trying to defend the indefensible. The pathetic references to tit-for-tat advertising as he feebly attempted to assume the high ground and his breath taking assertion that, in effect, product quality meant nothing and it was all about "the experience of chocolate". Another iconic name falls off my list of trusted brands". Pretty sad.

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downsizing shows how evil and synocal they are, but now I read that they took snifters off the market, better not be them that took tangy fruits off the market as well, Thats really multiplys bad judgement

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By far the best NZ made and owned chocolate product is Richfields 70% dark cocoa range. It will beat Whittakers hands down in any blind taste test - I'm surprised it isn't more readily available.

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Hey, if you want real chocolate, you need Schoc Chocolate (from Greytown NZ, with a Wellington outlet). Now they know how much cocoa to add! Cheers, Will

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We have heard Cadbury are soon to source finished products from China. They must be jealous Lindt gets away with a much smaller bar 100g.

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Richfields is indeed about as good or even a little better than Whittakers, but I'll happy buy either.

Schoc is simply wonderful stuff but is more than $10 for a much smaller block than the Cadburys or Whittakers, so more for special ocassions than for the daily scoff.

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Chocolate, bread, water, name it. We are not all fools. Dunedein was done "in", by Cadburys leaving New Zealand. New Zeakabd should be viewed by the west island, where many Kiwis work, as an intergral part of our two economies. We should be working together.
New Zealand milk is superior. Why force our farmers with less for grain and use Australian wheat. It does not end here. Food changing, cutting size etc etc .we are not stupid.
Hope this "new government that Kiwis wanted change" , see all this in higher decision making are realising the recession is very real and save us. We need to protect ourselves and we vote with all we have , even if it is as basic as eating real honest 250 gram slabs

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It's so obviously all about money saving and misleading the consumer which is happening all around us. It's time for the ethical consumer revolution.
Palm oil (vegetable fat) is added to chocolate in Australia as it increases the melting point which isn't required in UK and NZ cooler climates as suspected in previous posts. I suspect the reason for adding it here is so the Oz and NZ markets can be treated as one which in turn will save more money for Cadbury's.
Cadbury's are putting their profits before all NZer's, the environment and their customers. Time we all got back to community living and support each other rather than continue to put money into the pockets of foreign business men.

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Get a Grip! What a bunch of moaning tossers!!!

Cadbury NEVER had as much cocoa in it as Whittakers!
Cadbury dropped there costs - Supermarkets kept the price up.
Whittakers & Cadbury there is a big price increase (i.e Premium v Mass Produced)
Manufacturers delete products because people don't BUY them - So for all the 10 purchasers of snifters!! Oh well to bad - Maybe you should have bought them before the decision to delete was made!

Yes sure Cadbury laid of staff but they pump a helluva lot of money into our economy, unlike the Whittakers fat cats that get fatter and fatter!

Cadbury hasn't ripped you off - They have made difficult economic decisions! If you don't like it don't buy it!!

As for the article writter - I'm sorry what exactly are they trying to get away with..

Remember Arnotts moving all manufacturing to Australia, Bluebird downsizing chip packets.. It goes on and on and on!!

Oh funnily enough 7/10 consumers tested independantly can't even tell the difference between brands!!

BTW I don't work for Cadbury!

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Dear Jon
Before you post a comment telling us informed consumers what a bunch of whingers we are, it would be helpful to your cause if you got your spelling and grammar correct. Nothing like an uneducated, uninformed, ignorant person to bring discredit to people like yourself. Read the facts; Cadbury have taken their business off shore to Australia - i.e they aren't pumping money into the NZ economy AND they have chosen to add an obviously unsustainable, non-environmentally friendly ingredient to their product which makes it taste like rubbish. You are a lonely voice in a sea of thousands of ex-Cadbury consumers. Good luck with your spelling.

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Typical moaner - Resort to becoming critical to ones grammar when they then can't win the argument!!

Let’s check your facts.

Cadbury still produce boxed chocolate in NZ and some Pascall lines - Guess you’re wrong there.

"Obviously unsustainable" - Prove it?

Sponsorship – Isn’t that pumping money into the company?
Employing staff?
Buying products and services from other companies?

Grab a snifter and curl into a corner with your uneducated facts!

Thousands? Please back that up, oh and I see you didn't comment on the Premium v Mass Produced!

BTW - Am educated and your obviously not informed!

Oh dear, what a shame!!

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I think you nailed it on the head. We don't like what Cadbury's have become - so we won't buy it anymore.

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didn't your marketing staff know about the coca-cola mistake over changing the formula

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Goodbye Cadbury.

Was good to know you when you were alive but now you are dead.

Whittakers live.

But there is a chance of reincarnation.

Prove sustainability of your Palm Oil, where is it sourced??

HELP SAVE WILDLIFE, WHY CHANGE YOUR TRIED AND TRUE RECIPE, CAUSING YOUR MARKET UNHAPPINESS AND HAVING TO FIND NEW SOURCES OF CHOCOLATE.

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These guys know chocolate ... the Macadamia Block is outstanding! Cadbury deserve to be shot with a ball of their own vegetable fat ... for such stupidity! Al

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Your education clearly wasn't up to scratch, Jon. " Your" (sic) not really a writer, are you?

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MC Grammar called. He wants you to know that there's no such thing as an "uneducated fact".

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Finally are we starting to see the start of consumers voting for quality and not putting up with the crap from these manufacturers we have always put up with? I hope so. Next we should start boycotting banks and demanding they allow number poratability so we can take our business elsewhere when they treat us like crap!

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"Choc-wars" morphs into "Grammar Wars".

Classic.

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that at Woolworths and Paknsave , the price of chocolate goes up and down regularly.
Sometimes Cadbury and sometimes Whittakers is lowest price.
My latest bar is Whittakers, and my future purchases will be too.

PS Dear Jon , I am not impressed with your argument , it is now Whittakers every time.

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I've just called Cadbury for an RRP before (250g) and after (200g) and they weren't sure. Someone is apparently going to call me back. I'm worried that they don't have this info readily to hand.

At the New World, the standard price for the new Cadbury 200g block is $3.99. The Whittaker's 250g block standard price is $4.85. This makes the Cadbury version marginally more expensive (on a per-gram basis).

But when you consider the cocoa solids difference (21% for Cadbury compared to 33% for Whittaker's) and the ad in the NZ Herald today where Cadbury whinges about rising cocoa prices, I think you'll find Whittaker's the logical winner.

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I'm a Kiwi living in Australia and have always enjoyed Cadbury choc. That is until the company's decision to add palm oil to their chocolate. I actively seek out products that do not contain environmentally destroying palm oil and have always enjoyed a peanut slab. In Australia there are only select places where you can find NZ products but peanut slabs can usually be found in all supermarkets. I was super happy yesterday when I discovered the entire whittakers range (half of which I had no idea existed) in a Big W store. Needless to say I bought up large (at $3 a large block how could I not).

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I seem to remember that last Christmas Cadburys admitted that certain of its Roses chocolates were made in China.

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I am going to buy Whittakers just to support them.

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We've had fun in the past Cadbury but I'm sorry, our relationship is truly over. Thanks and buh-bye! Hellllllllo Whittakers.

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I am so happy to see this public lynching of Cadbury continue.

We have a massive opportunity to send corporates a message and we must demonstrate that we can take collective action SO damaging to a company that we can take them down.

Cadbury are complete mooses and I hope they suffer for years to come.

But the only way this will happen is if we can get middle New Zealand to remember how wronged they have been not in the next month, but in years to come.

We need discerning middle New Zealand chocoholics to rise up too (not just readers of NBR & social media fanatics)! Or else the PR will wear us down and Cadbury will win the war (albeit with some battle scares).

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@Good Choc! you work for Cadbury

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Well, I am a complete chocoholic and have always bought Cadburys dairy milk - occasionally caramello or cashew nut, but always Cadburys. It would have been my no. 1 can't live without food. Well not anymore! I knew nothing of the whole recipe change but a week or 2 ago bought my first bar of the new stuff and couldn't believe how greasy and un-chocolatey (is that a word?!) it tasted. Of course I immediately got on the internet and discovered the changes. Cadbury have completely stuffed up! I wouldn't buy the stuff now purely based on taste, but know I have seen the Whittakers ad I will be trying their milk chocolate. Based on what I've read above I think I'll like it!

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When I first tried Cadbury's in oz I thought it was off! I had a few more bars and they all tasted the same - then I realised their's was completely different for some reason. Never ate it while over there again, and if that's where ours is coming from now, I won't be eating it here either.

Why the difference anyway?
And why don't they make it here here and ship it to oz, they'll love us for it I'm sure :)

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I take umbrage with the writer -I thought NBR was meant to be a professional magazine. "While the sun shines out of their ass" is an unnecessary comment and not professional Hazel!

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Years ago my advertising agency did a campaign for CSH at their behest: 'The Thicker the Block The Better the Choc'. But I discovered a few weeks ago that Cadburys were now selling a very thin block. So I wrote to Cadburys and asked them whether all those years ago we'd been told to tell lies. In the answer I received they claimed to have tested the much thinner product and that it was preferred by consumers!

When I told him abut my correspondence with CSH, a friend of mine, who was a senior marketing exec at Cadburys in the old days wrote this to me:

'Your memory is absolutely correct. There was (and I'm sure still is) abundant evidence that people prefer thicker blocks. The thicker shape gives rise to a much enhanced organoleptic experience (don't you love that word! But it actually describes the experience rather well).

'In the early 1970s Cadburys worldwide were badly trounced by Rowntree, whose Yorkie Bar was perfectly in tune with what people really wanted. The price of cocoa beans rose dramatically in the early 70s (probably in sync with the oil shock), and manufacturers were faced with a choice - reduce the size and hold the price; or hold the size and increase the price. Cadburys misjudged badly, held the price and dropped the weight (you may remember the parallel experiment with the so-called "compound" chocolate which used cheaper raw materials and didn't taste so good - but was used as a covering on products with a flavoursome centre such as Easter eggs and Buzz Bars).

'Anyway, Cadburys quickly realised their mistake and reintroduced thicker standard bars; and launched Chunky Bars, which worked well as a guilt-free individual purchase and consumption item.

'It is nonsense for Cadbury's to suggest as they now are that people prefer the "flatter" sample...'

Cadbury's will rue the day the changed the size and adulterated the recipe. Those who forget history are condemned to repeat it!

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Cadbury always claimed that "each bar contains a glass and a half of dairy milk." If the bar is 20% smaller, surely the old slogan is no longer true either and therefore they should remove the imagery if it isn't.
As for people who are acting as devil's advocate on this issue, consumers should not have to tolerate continual lowering of food standards (including pack size and presentation).

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Well that's it for me too. There was a time when I thought Cadbury just couldn't be beaten, not any more.

No amount of marketing B.S. can disguise what a blatant attempt this is to maximise profits whilst not giving even the slightest concern to customers loyalty and taste preferences.

Hang your heads in deep shame, you coroprate bean counting exec's.
The public will "desert" you in droves and hopefully whatever complete idiot(s) at Cadbury came up with these idea's will soon get the rich rewards of the dole, they so richly deserve.

Whittakes here I come...open wide, LOL.

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Does work for for Cadbury "yeah right" LOL

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I'd be interested to know how the "Glass and a Half" formula actually works.

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Falling sales will make Cadbury wake up to the folly of reducing a quality product to an inferior cost focused product. Bring back the old recipe and size, call it "premium chocolate" and charge an extra buck a block. In my humble opinion, the old Cadbury chocolate was the best on the market.

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One of the world's most iconic admen, David Ogilvy said many years back:

"Stop cutting the quality of your products in search of bigger margins. The consumer always notices — and punishes you!"

As true now, as it was way back in the 60's....

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You Kiwis are a hoot. Have a lovely weekend LOL X

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I would go for the whittakers because they are more native and not like cadbry that make the base and send it to australia.

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Anyone know where I can buy Whittakers in Australia? Cadbury's new palm oil enhanced chocolate is totally inedible. I've switched to Black & Greens but I'm looking for other options.

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what i dont get is why did they bring in whittiers to compeet with cadbury????

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I see that Whittaker is misleading the consumers by suggesting that Cocoa Butter in not a Vegetable oil ! This is ignorance of high order !. like many other vegetable oil , cocoa butter is also a vegetable oil , but derived except that this is derived from cocoa beans.

The cocoa taste of Chocolate comes from the Cocoa solids (either cocoa mass or cocoa powder ) and not from Coca butter ( cocoa fat or Cocoa Oil). Cocoa butter do not add any taste to chocolate as it acts like any other vegetable oil with a bland taste profile.

Cocoa butter has been used /is being used for home cooking like other vegetable oil.

Small percentage of specifically prepared vegetable oil with much better functionality compared to cocoa butter is added replacing some cocoa butter, to improve the functionality of the chocolate and to give consumers great indulgence experience

I too do not work for Cadbury. But I appreciate their innovation as well as products

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I did some search and found that cocoa butter is also a vegetable fat like any other vegetable oil. You cannot use any vegetable fat in chocolate. You can replace some cocoa butter with better quality vegetable fat made from a blend of Shea butter and a specially extracted component of palm oil. Shea butter is extracted from shea nuts of African origin. In fact, mostly same farmers are involved in Cocoa butter farming as well as Shea Nut collection. In fact the vegetable oil used in Chocolate contains more than 50% Shea butter. Unlike cocoa butter, Shea butter has great medicinal properties. Cadbury is greatly helping the poor villagers in Africa to earn a living by using Shea butter in the formulation of vegetable fat. I find by this Cadbury is fulfilling their social responsibility. Cadbury, keep it up! Your chocolate taste great! The Whitakers can cry foul. They do nothing for the poor

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Taste Cadburys Dairy milk made in Britian, Australia and New Zealand and the difference is noticeable across all three. The milk used in the various countries differs due to pastoral, climatic and environmental differences. Same as when Steinlager or Fosters or any other product is made under licence elsewhere. for the record - Britian Cadburys - rubbish, Aussie Cadburys - crap and greasy, NZ Cadburys - was the best with the emphasis on was. after 35 years of Cadburys i now eat Whittakers unless I find the odd old bar of cadburys on teh shelf that was made in Nz. There are still a few around.

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Shame on Cadbury! Cadbury remains one of the most recognizable brand in chocolate! Why they would need to stoop so low is beyond my comprehension. Whatever happened to the display stand that advertised there was a glass and a half of milk in every block? Often the grass roots or original concept of a brand is the best. Take heed Cadbury!

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