NZ app makes it easy to flick through email. No, really. Stay with me here.

KeallHauled

Chris Keall

I know, I know - most of you would rather stab your own eyes out with a fork than read another article on how to organise your email (sorry, Debbie), or a spiel on yet another app that claims to do it for you.

But Trade Me alumnus Rowan Simpson and his crew at Southgate Labs have created an app that actually does make it quick and easy to trim down your inbox.

Triage does exactly what it says on the tin.

That is, it doesn't replace your email client (such as Gmail. Most popular clients are supported).

Instead, it presents your new email as stack of cards.

You flick a card up to archive it. Or flick it down if you want it to stay in your inbox to deal with later when you open your email proper. You can also use Triage to type short replies.

Simpson says it's a great way to quickly process email during downtime, and he's right.

Triage is available through the iTunes AppStore here for $2.59.

My only moan: why do so many developers still prioritise iPhone when high-end Androids are now selling in equal numbers (and overall, Android is totally dominating the market. I do accept that budget Android handset customers buy fewer apps).

Anyhow, Simpson says Southgate will consider an Android version if Triage is a hit.

From a quick play (it was only released today), I'm guessing that's quite on the cards.

Check out Rowan's blog for some wry backstory.

ckeall@nbr.co.nz

Postscript: I saw some comments on social media about the lack of a Windows Phone version. I put that to Simpson, who said he would consider licensing the idea to a Windows developer.


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10 Comments & Questions

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This seems to be a competitor to 'Mailbox' (both have a goal of 'zero inbox') which came out of private beta last night to be open to all.

Coincidence? - probably.

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That would Mailbox the app with a hype wait list hundreds of thousands of users long?

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Yip - http://techcrunch.com/2013/04/16/mailbox-drops-its-reservation-system-as...

Mailbox was bought by Dropbox for an alledged $100m in cash and stock so good luck to the Southgate guys.

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"My only moan: why do so many developers still prioritise iPhone when high-end Androids are now selling in equal numbers (and overall, Android is totally dominating the market. I do accept that budget Android handset customers buy fewer apps)."

Android is simply the Symbian of this decade. No one really chooses it, it's just what they get stuck with if they don't choose an iPhone.

In simplistic broad generalisations sure to rile people, iPhone users use apps, Android users don't. Further more, iPhone users are more willing to pay for apps than Android users.

Tough building a business where people don't use what you're selling, let alone be willing to pay for it ;)

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Agree completely. We have Android and iOS apps in the various stores and the iOS versions outsell the Android versions 10 to 1.

Simple maths really.

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I disagree with such a generalist comment, people I know prefer to pay for Android apps over iPhone apps, as they perceive them to be better value, and not ripping off the app developer with such a big 'slice of the pie'.

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I, too, pay for Android apps.

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The real reason app developers prioritise iPhone over Android is variety. On Android, that's a big problem as there are hundreds if not thousands of different configurations. iOS is simply on iPhones, of which there are only a few different native resolutions, depending on the model.

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"My only moan: why do so many developers still prioritise iPhone when high-end Androids are now selling in equal numbers (and overall, Android is totally dominating the market."

The main issue here, Chris, is Android has so many different variables (such as screen size, resolution, blah, blah), not to mention the plethora of different handsets to contend with, that it is a complete and utter PITA to deal with. iPhone isn't. It has the one standard; well, two if you include Retina displays, which is easier and a far cheaper proposition for developers. Programming for Android costs more in time and money, and makes developers bald.

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A windows developer doesn't need to pay for a licence for the idea - there is no property in an idea.

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